Welcome to my blog

Welcome to my blog

Wednesday, 10 May 2017

Bad language

Tonight at my WI meeting we had the best speaker that we have ever had.  The lady was an expert in 'one stroke' painting and her jokes and banter had us all in stitches.  Unfortunately she went a bit too far and as the evening wore on her jokes and banter became rather more crude than we are used to. Most of the ladies are well into their seventies and eighties and were more than a little shocked.  It was such a shame as she really was entertaining and didn't need to to resort to being crude. Her humour would probably have gone down well in an army barracks.
I may have mentioned before that 'bad language' makes me uncomfortable.  It is just so unnecessary and adds nothing to a conversation. I don't use bad language and my lovely hubby never uses bad language in front of me even in the middle of heated words.  I count my blessings to have found such a gentleman

3 comments:

  1. That is the very reason that most "comedians" leave me cold, if you can not speak without being crude and rude then it is best to stay silent. At school the punishment for using "Lavatory Language" was instant and severe. At home it was a way to get the dirtiest jobs on a daily basis, we had a holding and there were lots of nasty jobs. In a family of knitters "Dropped Stitch" was considered an acceptable steamy word.

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  2. I too dislike crude language, I came accross a 'bad word' when looking at knitting patterns this morning, this sort of unpleasantness has a way of sticking in your head like some tunes. Unwanted and difficult to remove.

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  3. I am in agreement. I was lucky to be raised in a household where my father never swore and now have been married for 46 years to a man who doesn't. It seems that the generation after us has many more women as well as men who use crude language.
    However, while searching for a knitting pattern, Joyce that is really strange!
    JanF

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